Last updated: 08/09/2016

genetic resources

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  • Crop Genetic Resources as a Global Commons

    ITPGRFA
     Routledge launches the book "Crop Genetic Resources as a Global Commons: Challenges in International Law and Governance", edited by Michael Halewood, Isabel López Noriega and Selim Louafi, as a part of series Issues in Agricultural Biodiversity.
  • EU contributes €5 million to help farmers maintain crop diversity

    ITPGRFA
    Support under plant genetics treaty fund announced during Rio+20 21 June 2012, Rio de Janeiro - The European Union is contributing €5 million euros (6.5 million dollars) towards the Benefit-sharing Fund of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, FAO announced today, at a high-level ministerial meeting on the plant treaty at the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.
  • FAO says traditional crops key to facing climate change

    ITPGRFA
    On 10th anniversary, international plant genetics treaty funds new projects 14 November 2011, Rome – Traditional food crops and other plant varieties worldwide are in urgent need of protection from climate change and other environmental stresses, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said today, as it observed the tenth anniversary of the international treaty to protect and share plant genetic resources.
  • Countries meet to boost Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources

    ITPGRFA
    8 December 2010, Rome. Senior representatives of more than 60 countries including 22 cabinet ministers have met in Rome as part of a new push to galvanize support behind the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources and its Benefit-sharing Fund, considered essential to conserve and utilize the world's threatened plant genetic resources for food and agriculture.
  • FAO launches 2nd State of the World’s Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture report

    ITPGRFA
    26 October 2010, Rome – The genetic diversity of the plants that we grow and eat and their “wild relatives” could be lost forever, threatening future food security, unless special efforts are stepped up to not only conserve but also utilize them, especially in developing countries. This is one of the key messages of the second report on The State of the World’s Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, launched today by FAO.